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Young Bo Chang


Young Bo Chang

Young Bo Chang

BA, Business Management & Travel Management, 1979
international Businessman
Tahiti, French Polynesia

From his early beginnings of poverty and receiving service from early missionaries in Korea to learning values of love and honesty at the Church College of Hawaii, Young Bo Chang has molded his life into serving others just as he had received such kindness and service in his early life.

Brother Chang’s family was converted to the church through the help of early missionaries in Korea and a dream his brother had in which he visited rooms of the Salt Lake Temple. After joining the church, he served as a missionary in his homeland and subsequently as branch president in Pusan. He was then asked to teach Korean at the Language Training Mission in Hawaii. Before leaving Korea, Chang married Chung Ja Lee; and after arriving in Laie, embarked on his studies at the Church College of Hawaii and also served in the Hawaii Temple. After several years of hard work and study, he received one degree in business management and one in travel and tourism. Due to his proficiency in Tae Kwon Do, he was offered a position to teach this martial art in Tahiti. He moved there with his wife and three daughters (a son was born in Tahiti).

After several years of hardship in Tahiti, the Lord blessed him greatly. Using the skills and values he learned at BYU-Hawaii, he strengthened Tahiti’s international ties in Tae Kwon Do, started his own fishing agency, became successful in import-export, and established good trade relations between Korea, Hong Kong, and Tahiti. He was awarded the National Medal from the Republic of Korea and two Presidential Medals (one from President Roh Tae Woo; one from President Kim Dae Jung) for his international work in the deep sea fishing industry. He was also appointed French Polynesia’s representative on the Korea Trade Promotion Corporation. His success has rewarded him financially as well, which has allowed Brother Chang to serve many people and organizations worldwide, including African food charities, American health associations and disaster relief efforts, and various education scholarships in Korea and America.

The Lord was watched out for me all of my life – saving me and my family from starvation as a young boy, guiding us into the church, and blessing me financially in my later years. I will forever be indebted to Him and also to the education I received at BYU-Hawaii. The education I speak of is not just of books and lectures, but of strong morals and values such as love and honesty that are abundant at BYU-Hawaii. In business, I have found that having honesty, love, and respect in all of my dealings quickly fosters a crucial relationship of trust that has led to success in my life. I’ve tried to live my life as described in the New Testament. “Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, Do not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not her own (1 Corinthians 13:4-5).